Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Q&A: Charging for Copies of Financial Documents


BY: MARTIN C. CABALAR


Question:       

Is there a limit how much we can charge to pull, provide and copy requested paperwork? Can we make a profit?

Answer:

Yes, there is a limit to the amount a condominium association can charge its residents to provide copies of records the association is required to keep open to inspection by its owners. In New Jersey, the charge cannot exceed an amount reasonably related to the association’s copying cost, which may include any additional administrative expense incurred. Therefore, unless your governing documents provide otherwise, the association may charge the cost for copying.

It is important to keep in mind that the New Jersey Condominium Act provides that associations shall be responsible for “the maintenance of accounting records in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles open to inspection by unit owners at reasonable times.” N.J.S.A. 46:8B-14(g) (emphasis added). The accounting records required to be open to inspection by unit owners include (1) a record of all receipts and expenditures and (2) an account for each unit setting forth any shares of common expenses or other charges due, the due dates thereof, the present balance due and any interest in common surplus. Thus, while the association may charge a fee reasonably related to the association’s copying cost to provide copies, the association must grant access to inspect the financial records required to be kept open to inspection without charge to the unit owners. Even if another party, such as the Association’s managing agent or accountant, charges the association a production fee, the association cannot charge the owner a fee to merely inspect these records.

Finally, while the Condominium Act is silent as to whether owners have a right to make copies, and New Jersey case law has not resolved this precise issue, the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs takes the position that the right of inspection includes the right to copies of those documents. Thus, we recommend that you allow members to make copies of financial records that are required to be open to inspection.

1 comment:

  1. Indeed every company around the world can make the profit from making the copies and the margin of the success is always great. It has proved to be a good business for some.

    ReplyDelete

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